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What We've Been Reading

  • The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures

    The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down is a great showcase of why the American healthcare system needs a huge coss-cultural training overhaul. A Hmong family combats and tries to understand a system that was neither created with them in mind nor puts thier spirituality near the scientific system in the hierarchy of thought. Oh, cultural relativism! You frustrating, but important concept!

    - Kirsten


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  • Sex at Dawn: How We Mate, Why We Stray, and What It Means for Modern Relationships

    Ryan and Jetha investigative piece, Sex at Dawn, puts a lot of relationship quirks in a perspective that both makes sense and makes you think 'oooh ahh!' An interesting evolutionary lense on topics such as orgasms, jealousy, monogamy, and our cousins' (chimps/bonobos) input on how we view sexuality. A book that will make your more knowledgeable in all the right ways!

    - Kirsten 


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  • Cinder

    Cinder is the first of six books in the Lunar Chronicles young adult series, in which Meyer reimagines classic fairy tale heroines in a post-World War IV, intergalactic setting. A culturally diverse cast must navigate prejudice, free will, duty, societal upheaval and political corruption. You'll be reading well into the night to relish the satisfying way everything falls into place over the course of the series!

    -Meghan F


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  • Dancing with the Tiger

    Dive into Mexico's underground art world in this boiling summer thriller! A fast-paced rat race with an eclectic cast, scintillating character development, and visceral, culturally-sensitive writing. You won't be able to this debut novel down!

    -Meghan F


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  • Sex Object

    So! Good! This is not necessarily a 101 introduction to feminism, as one needs a solid foundation from which to aproach this text, but I love the ambiguity Valenti introduces. Touching, terrifying, soothing.

    -Meghan F


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  • Carve the Mark

    Our protagonists must overcome divisive language, muddled politics, and their own prejudices and hurts if they are to survive in Veronica Roth's explosive, interstellar adventure! 

    -Meghan F


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  • The Girls

    This is a fantastically dark summer read! Redolent of Gillian Flynn's Dark Places and Nabokov's Lolita, Cline's tender, heady, unsettling prose will leave you humbled and just a little bit afraid. 

    -Meghan F


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  • Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town

    You must read this. You have to. Jon Krakauer proves relentlessly that danger lies not in masked strangers but in our own passivity, in our narcissism, in our senses of fraternity and entitlement. Gender discrimination is alive and well, and only through self-education can we hope to combat today's surplus of misinformation!

    -Meghan F


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  • The Stars Are Fire

    Character, plot, and setting all earn rave reviews from me in this book, which begins just before the 1947 fire that demolished many towns in Maine, including the one in which the main character, Grace Holland lives.  The description is brilliant of the unease,  concern, and terror experienced by town’s people as the fire grew .  The  plot contains real life issues and the characters are complex .  I read this one late into the night, because I loved it.

    -Debbie Taylor,  Bar Harbor


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  • The Baker's Secret

    You will fall in love with Emma, a young baker whose small clandestine acts keep her German occupied town in Normandy from starvation in the year before D-Day. In addition to enjoying the riveting story, I particularly appreciated learning more about daily French village life during the occupation.

    -Jeff


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